A Level Tutors

Our A level tutors are all experienced teachers and subject specialists. They can provide support across a range of subjects, specifications and many have experience working as examiners. Here you will find useful information about A level qualifications, links to informative articles and of course, our tutors. Please use the search bar below to refine your search by subject and specification. Owl Tutors can provide tutors for both home and online tuition.


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Latest A-level testimonials

"We have enjoyed working with Sobia preparing for 16+ entrance examinations. Sobia was always prompt to lessons and flexible should there be a need to move or cancel a session for any reason. Sobia always replied to our emails in a timely manner and the lesson feedback was useful. Sobia also adapted her lessons based on my daughter's desire to focus on specific areas such as interview skills. We would highly recommend Sobia based on our experience to date."

Parent of 16 Plus student

Monday, 8th August 2022


A Level Overview

The Advanced Level (A Level) qualification refers to Level 3 qualifications sat after GCSEs and before undergraduate study. Typically, it is studied in Years 12-13 (between the ages of 16-18) in the UK. Students generally study between 3 and 4 subjects, with no restrictions on choice of subjects other than what is offered by their college or school.

How does assessment work at A-Level?

After the A level reforms a few years ago, the examinations for most subjects take place in May or June of Year 13. This replaced the modular system in 2016. The previous system allowed students to sit and ‘save’ their marks in separate examinations that contributed toward their overall A level grade, with a 50/50 split between AS (the first year) and A2 (the second year) of the qualifications. Now, 100% of the grade is determined by the examinations (and for some subjects, partially the coursework) in the final year of study.

It is possible for students to sit for AS examinations in the first year, but the awarded grade does not contribute towards their overall grade. If the full A level is sat the next year, this AS grade is ‘wiped’ and replaced with the full A level grade.

How can I help my child with their A-Levels?

Due to the increased difficulty level, students may well require extra help to complete A Level courses. There are many excellent revision guides available. From our experience, students need help in revising effectively and may need help in planning a revision timetable. Of course, it helps if they are on top of their studies throughout the course! Revision is much more effective when it is re-capping previously studied ideas, as opposed to learning material for the first time. Revision that is little and often is much more effective (and less stressful!) than cramming at the last minute.

Use the resources already out there. All exam boards publish specifications, past exam papers (except usually the previous years’ ones) and examiners’ reports. Each of these give really important insights not only to what the exam will look like, but what the examiners will be expecting students to produce. The examiners reports in particular, although not likely to win a Noble Prize for Literature, provide a blow by blow account of the previous years exams: what did students do well? What did they not do well? What are the common mistakes to avoid? This can really help inform your revision planning.

Have a look at the links below for each exam board and search for the relevant subjects.

Working with a tutor one to one can also make a big difference, particularly if there are clear areas of improvement. The benefit of working this way is that the tuition can go at the students pace and time can be spent on ensuring understanding and examination technique. Equally, many students find tuition can help provide stretch and challenge, particularly if they intend to apply to more competitive universities.

A-Level Exam Boards

The five exam boards at A-Level in the UK are AQA, CCEA, Edexcel, OCR and Eduqas/WJEC. Originally there were many more exam boards, all affiliated with UK Universities. They merged together into these four over the last fifty years. Schools will normally use some or all of these across different subjects, selecting the boards offering the syllabuses that best suit their needs. When looking for a tutor, it is useful to know which specification you require support with. Although there are broad similarities between them, there is often a variation in the examination format and mark schemes. Matching with a tutor who is very familiar with the specification will ensure tuition is targeted and focused.

You can find the A level exam boards below. You will need to filter your search by subject and level:

AQA

CCEA

Edexcel

Eduqas/WJEC

OCR

Recent A-level blog posts

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Read All About It! How to efficiently follow current events to boost your grades in A-level Politics

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